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Zen and the Art of Noise Reduction

Hi, I’m Stu Welsh aka Beliefspacestu, Degree and Masters Course Leader at dBs Music, Owner of Fiercely Indie Records and previously designer and owner of Tanglewood Studio and Beliefspace Studio in Plymouth, UK. I have qualifications in Media Arts, Computer Music, Education, Pro Tools and am a current member of the Audio Engineering Society. 

“Maker” has become a trendy word over the past few years with Makerspaces appearing and Adam Savage’s Tested promoting the idea of multi-skilled collectives to work on projects and solves problem.  In this respect, I have always been a maker myself.  Fascinated in how things work, taking things apart, eventually working out how to put them back together and, eventually, to “mod”, “bend” or “hack” them to create new and interesting projects and solve problems. 

As such I have developed a wide skill-set which ranges from electronics to programming and 3D acoustic design to music technology. I am told that this makes me particularly strong at System’s Integration which usually involves planning complex technical systems such as electronic/audio/video/computer systems, studio design (equipment and acoustics), and the associated planning and management required for the realisation of diverse projects. 

My current academic research practice is rooted in audio electronics can be employed to explore and interact with our sonic environment.  I am fascinated with audio electronics, old and new. Specifically how, what was widely considered to be, outdated electronics has enjoyed a revival and given rise to a large number modern clones of classic units such as the Urei 1176.

Research Blog

Charge Collector

Charge Collector

Recently, during the disassembly an old Danavox Induction Loop tester I managed to salvage an analogue dB Meter (amongst other parts). Remembering the other two analogue VU meters (similar to those found in the Roland Space Echo) stored away in the lab, the decision...

Field Detector

Field Detector

Another one of Alan's contraptions (vk2zay). After building the audio version of the Electroscope, I became interested in what types of emissions are given off by lights and other electrical equipment and appliances. There's several circuits on this battery topper all...

Electroscopes

Electroscopes

Based on a few very common NPN/PNP 3904/3906 (or any small signal) transistors and a handful of resistors and a couple of LEDs these circuits provides around a 6 million gain to detect small electrostatic fields.

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